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Sunday, July 25, 2021

How To Speak Larkspur: A Complete Guide To Growing Your Larkspur

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The best thing about winter is the next season that greets you: spring. As this new season begins to blossom, flowers boast their unique colors and varieties. With this, you may want to add fresh garden tricks to greet you, one of the best being the beautiful larkspur.

The larkspur is often mistaken for its close relative, the delphinium since both plants belong to the buttercup family and are popular cut flowers. However, these two plants are different as larkspurs are annuals, whereas delphiniums are perennials.

Thus, with the 40 species of the Consolida, you may want to know the best ones to grow in your garden and the process of developing them. For this, take out your notepad and continue below:

5 Species For Larkspur

Before you can get to planting larkspur, you need to know the best ones to plant. By doing so, you could get a mental picture of how these flowers will look once it fully blooms in the spring. Likewise, since these annuals come in various pink, blue, white, and purple, larkspur flowers will grant your garden a new pop of color. Thus, expect a more vivid garden during the springtime!

Consolida ajacis

C. ajacis is native in the Mediterranean, and they come in colors of blue, pink, or white. This species is commonly known as the doubtful knights-spur or giant larkspur, proud of its five-petaled flower surrounding two-enclosed ones.

Consolida orientalis

Introduced from Southern Europe, this species is also known as oriental knights-spur with its tall stature and lobed or unlobed leaves. Likewise, C. orientalis will have a complete spire of magenta-purple petals.

Consolida pubescens

C. pubescens will show pale blue, pale purple, or white flowers and lobed leaves of one to three cm wide once it blossoms. Likewise, it is known as the hairy knights-spur and is native to the western Mediterranean area.

Consolida regalis

C. regalis is known as the royal knights-spur, forking, rocket, or even field larkspur with its name. Its elegant and deep blue flowers greatly contrast with its thin green stems, captivating you in the spring.

Consolida tenuissima

Native to Greece and naturalized in Missouri, the C. tenuissima is known as the long knights-spur with its blush of deep blue and violet flowers. This species has lobed semicircular leaves topped by a long green stem.

Sowing Larkspur

Since you’ve already known the species to grow, sowing larkspur seeds will come in easy. With this, take note of these tips below:

Indoors

For Zone two until five, you may want to start your seeds indoors for about four to six weeks before the average winter date. You should place your seeds in biodegradable pots and add a potting mix that will only account for ¼ of the ground.

Additionally, it would help if you watered the seeds and kept them moist by using a spray bottle. Once the seeds have bloomed, you can place them out in the garden after the average winter date.

Outdoors

For Zones six until 11, sowing your seeds outdoors after the average winter date is ideal. For this, you may want to place two seeds in holes that are 12 inches apart and half an inch deep in an area that gets six to eight hours of sunlight. Likewise, moist soil is also the best, so you should water your seeds thoroughly.

You could also plant seeds in the fall to subject your seeds to the cold. You could also decide to cold stratify plants in a refrigerator two weeks before planting them.

Growing Larkspur

Soil And Acidity

Larkspur can grow in a wide variety of soil acidity, but the most ideal would be the acidity between 5.7 and 7.0. This will ensure that they get rich but moderately loose ground that accounts for their needs.

Water And Food

Watering your plants once or even twice a week is the most ideal. You could also check the moisture by sticking your finger one inch in the ground. If it’s still moist, avoid watering your plant for one or two days.

Likewise, if you see two or three sets of pure leaves, it’s now time to feed your plants with a balanced fertilizer. Do remember to follow the instructions found in your fertilizer’s instructions kit and provide food for your plant for one month.

Staking

Unlike the delphiniums, larkspur can stand well on its own. This means that it will no longer need heavy staking during its growth. However, if you do find your stalks are tilting or in need of support, you could use a stake three inches down and tie the stake to the stem with a tie.

Takeaway

It is essentially easy to speak the language of larkspur as these annuals grant your garden new hues with only little effort and a bit of research. Likewise, since you’ve read about the basics of these species, you’re fully equipped to start planting them on your own. Thus, get your glasses ready as these flowers will surely wow you in the springtime.

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